Visitors to the Grand Canyon are being asked not to leave padlocks there as a sign of love because it harms the environment.

Visitors to the Grand Canyon are being asked not to leave padlocks there as a sign of love because it harms the environment.

  • 23.10.2023 12:06

"Love is strong, but our bolt cutters are stronger," says a new post on the Grand Canyon National Park's Facebook page. The park management is concerned about the so-called "love locks" that people attach to metal fences, often engraved with the couple's names or initials, and then throw the keys into the nearest body of water. CNN reported on how this could impact the park.

Many believe that these locks bring good luck to their relationships, and throwing away the key symbolizes their undying love.

However, if the locks themselves are considered "trash" in the park, the keys can pose even more serious problems.

California condors, which are critically endangered, are attracted to shiny objects, so some birds may swallow the keys, leading to the need for surgical procedures to remove them.

"Condors are curious creatures and, like a young child, will investigate strange objects with their beaks when they encounter them," the post stated. "Condors are unable to digest metal, but they often cannot resist these objects. If a condor ingests too many, it can be fatal."

Love locks have caused problems in other places as well, notably on the Pont des Arts bridge in Paris, where they became so heavy that they compromised the structural integrity of the bridge.

When city authorities in Paris removed all the "love locks" in 2015, the weight of 700,000 metal items was equivalent to the weight of 20 elephants.

After dismantling the iron declarations of love, city officials installed glass panels on the bridge to prevent anyone from locking their feelings away in the form of a padlock.